Cape Cod Institute
 
Behavior OnLine Forums  
The gathering place for Mental Health and
Applied Behavior Science Professionals.
 
Become a charter member of Behavior OnLine.

Go Back   Behavior OnLine Forums > BOL Forums > Classical Adlerian Psychotherapy

Notices

Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Unread March 23rd, 2005, 04:39 PM
Henry Stein Henry Stein is offline
Forum Leader
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Bellingham, Washington
Posts: 399
Default Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs and Classical Adlerian Psychotherapy

Two new graphic images, "Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Human Needs," and "The Phases and Stages of Classical Adlerian Psychotherapy" have been added to our web site at http://www.Adlerian.us/Needs.htm. Maslow and Adler were powerful visionaries, infusing psychology with inspiring ideals of human potential. Their passion for higher values provides a refreshing antidote to the limited perspectives of contemporary psychology that focus on quick, superficial symptom relief and modest behavioral change. The Classical Adlerian approach offers a depth psychotherapy capable of dissolving the style of life and fictional final goal, overcoming the limits of "deficiency motivation," then experiencing a new "growth motivation" in the pursuit of a chosen higher value.

Maslow's idea of self-actualization has elicited some controversy about its potential for promoting egocentricity. I have re-named the term "self/other/task-actualization" to clarify the true direction of that process. These charts are works in progress; your feedback about improvements are welcome.
__________________
Henry T. Stein, Ph.D,

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by Henry Stein; February 27th, 2010 at 11:22 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Unread March 24th, 2005, 10:15 AM
Henry Stein Henry Stein is offline
Forum Leader
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Bellingham, Washington
Posts: 399
Default Re: Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs and Classical Adlerian Psychotherapy

Maslow's "hierarchy of needs" suggests a sequential meeting of basic needs, freeing the individual to pursue the next higher need. An Adlerian view of these basic needs is less hierarchical, believing that the development of the feeling of community yields the most effective concurrent meeting of all basic needs. In this respect, the pursuit of the basic needs, fortified by the feeling of community, can be integrated, rather than sequential (i.e., safety and esteem, tied into belonging). From an Adlerian view, the feeling of community is a pre-requisite for the process of self/other/task-actualization.
__________________
Henry T. Stein, Ph.D,

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Unread February 6th, 2006, 11:04 PM
sweetpea sweetpea is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1
Default Re: Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs and Classical Adlerian Psychotherapy

If a person is lacking self -esteem, and has poor body image of themselves, using maslow's theory, would you say the problem is because this individual is first lacking the basic needs as described in his theory?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Unread February 7th, 2006, 09:28 PM
Henry Stein Henry Stein is offline
Forum Leader
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Bellingham, Washington
Posts: 399
Default Re: Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs and Classical Adlerian Psychotherapy

A lack of self-esteem certainly would fit Maslow's model as a deficient basic need, but to explore the issue of "cause" we would have to move to Adler's model of the personality. According to Adler, a lack of self-esteem and poor body image may have many roots, one of which could be related to physical abnormalities, but it may also be rooted in unrealistic comparisons to others or ideals. Ultimately, the "cause" becomes the individual's opinion, fictional final goal, and private logic, usually reflecting a low level of social interest. As Adler constantly emphasizes, the only effective compensation for feelings of inferiority is an increase in social interest and a feeling of equality with others. A sucessful solution to all of the basic needs, is intimately connected to sufficient social feeling.
__________________
Henry T. Stein, Ph.D,

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 1995-2004 Behavior OnLine, Inc. All rights reserved.