Cape Cod Institute
 
Behavior OnLine Forums  
The gathering place for Mental Health and
Applied Behavior Science Professionals.
 
Become a charter member of Behavior OnLine.

Go Back   Behavior OnLine Forums > BOL Forums > Ericksonian Therapy

Notices

Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Unread July 28th, 2007, 11:36 AM
emdrhypno emdrhypno is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Boulder, Colorado
Posts: 30
Default Direct vs. Indirect Suggestions

I'm curious what other peoples' personal experience is using direct vs. indirect suggestions, and also if anyone is familiar with/has opinions on the various studies regarding outcome of using one versus the other.

Last edited by emdrhypno; July 28th, 2007 at 11:39 AM. Reason: wrong forum!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Unread August 6th, 2007, 02:42 AM
Stephen Lankton Stephen Lankton is offline
Forum Leader
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Posts: 117
Default Re: Direct vs. Indirect Suggestions

Research studies need to have specific indicators of outcome. As a result, movement of limbs is a popular indicator of empirical research on indirect v direct suggestion. Basically, the question is which type makes the subject move more. But the snag is that indirect suggestion was never meant to MAKE anyone do anything but rather to facilitate unique responses that are relevant for the client. So, the research paradigms are a bit constrained for this 'open ended' outcome measurement. Nevertheless, BTW, each is shown to create approximately the same results in those studies. Many studies also ask respondents about subjective experiences of trance and subjects often report they were deeper or more absorbed following indirect suggestion. Of course, standardized test results showed the same depth of trance in these cases but the indirect subjects reported a more personal depth. [in a nut shell]
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Unread August 6th, 2007, 02:56 PM
JustBen JustBen is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 58
Default Re: Direct vs. Indirect Suggestions

Why not just ask the client which they'd prefer?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Unread August 7th, 2007, 04:04 AM
Stephen Lankton Stephen Lankton is offline
Forum Leader
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Posts: 117
Default Re: Direct vs. Indirect Suggestions

if that was all there was to it, they would not be in your office, now would they.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Unread July 15th, 2009, 11:17 AM
Light94 Light94 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 8
Default Re: Direct vs. Indirect Suggestions

i like indirect suggestions more. they cant resist the suggestions if they dont know what your saying is a suggestion
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Unread March 23rd, 2010, 06:13 AM
Eugene_D Eugene_D is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 2
Default Re: Direct vs. Indirect Suggestions

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen Lankton View Post
if that was all there was to it, they would not be in your office, now would they.
Dear Stephen,

can you expand a little your thoughts about this?

and another...
when MHE made post-hypnotic-suggestion with amnesia, was there manipulation and whether we can suggest anything in such fashion?

Thanks,
Eugene.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Unread April 12th, 2010, 08:31 AM
Whiterabbit Whiterabbit is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 7
Default Re: Direct vs. Indirect Suggestions

In my work I only use indirect suggestion. As has been stated direct suggestions are often met with resistance. This may not be a conscious resistance. I have found that suggestions posed as questions and paired with pacing to be very effective. The key in my work is to get people to relax and to acheve rapport rapidly.
WR
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:27 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 1995-2004 Behavior OnLine, Inc. All rights reserved.