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  #11  
Unread November 25th, 2005, 11:32 AM
Henry Stein Henry Stein is offline
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Default Discussion of CCWAA, Vol. 7, Chapt. VI & VII (Fear of Men, Substance Abuse)

On November 28th, we will begin a discussion of The Collected Clinical Works of Alfred Adler, Volume 7, Chapters VI & VII. The following chapter summaries were prepared by Manu Jaaskelainen.

Ch. VI The Fear of Women (1932) is a short note on the women's fear of a man. The note was published originally in a book on sexual difficulties. Adler argues that a feeling of guilt ("bad conscience") may be a significant factor in sexual impotence. "In many cases, a conflict regarding sexual relations, particularly a fear of women, can be traced back to a feeling of dishonorableness. The man feels that he is not honorable when he approaches a woman. He feels like a thief, proposing to enrich himself at another's expense." Adler points out that many women believe that sexuality means injury or insult for them.

Ch. VII Narcotic Abuse and Alcoholism (1932) is based on lecture Adler held in the Berlin House of Medical Profession. According to Adler, substance abusers and alcoholics are people who are not able to confront the basic tasks of life with courage, patience, and experience, but people who in difficult situations first look for relief. Adler presents us a method of investigation: he begins with questions regarding the relationships between "I and thou" - friendships, truthfulness, loyalty, the ability to establish new relationships etc. Then there are questions concerning work and the preparation for life-tasks. Most people with grave problems are badly prepared for the challenges of life. There are questions concerning the communal feeling, or social interest. Adler proceeds to examine in more detail some symptoms of these clients, e.g. impatience, suspiciousness, jealousy, etc. He would like to explore in more detail the early development of these clients: possible pampering, and other hindrances for psychological growth. The paper contains a number of case studies that illustrate his arguments.

To order your copy of Volume 7, go to http://go.ourworld.nu/hstein/cwaa-v7.htm .
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  #12  
Unread December 3rd, 2005, 05:16 PM
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Default Discussion of CCWAA, Vol. 7, Chapt. VIII & IX (Unity & Structure)

On December 5th, we will begin a discussion of The Collected Clinical Works of Alfred Adler, Volume 7, Chapters VIII & IX. The following chapter summaries were prepared by Manu Jaaskelainen.

Ch. VIII Personality as a Self-Consistent Unity (1932) is a paper on the unity and totality of the human personality. Adler argues strongly for the idea of the spiritual life and does not accept the tenets of behaviorism in this respect. "Like every other science, IP leads into metaphysics." Poets, painters and composers create whole personalities, such as a child who becomes the adult in a unique, never reoccurring unity, in which every part fits the whole personality. There is a reference to Schopenhauer and Shakespeare, once again. Shakespeare, like no other, was a genius in creating such examples of unique, whole personalities in his dramas.

Ch. IX Structure and Methods of Individual Psychology (1932) is a very important paper on the general nature of IP. The paper was translated by Sophia J. de Vries. Adler argues for the philosophical relevance of IP: "We consider psyche a metaphysical construct." Self is a unit that creates itself; the responses of this self occur in situations created by the human community. Human personality is not created by inheritance, but formed in the early years under the influence of organ inferiority and the environment. However, even the influences from the environment are not "determining" anything; they create only "probabilities", as Adler says. Adler concludes his paper emphasizing the importance of social interest in the education of children.

To order your copy of Volume 7, go to http://go.ourworld.nu/hstein/cwaa-v7.htm .
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  #13  
Unread December 11th, 2005, 09:35 AM
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Default Discussion of CCWAA, Vol. 7, Chapt. X & XI (Education, Therapy)

Discussion of CCWAA, Vol. 7, Chapt. X & XI (Education, Therapy)

On December 12th, we will begin a discussion of The Collected Clinical Works of Alfred Adler, Volume 7, Chapters X & XI. The following chapter summaries were prepared by Manu Jaaskelainen.

Ch. X Individual Psychology and Education (1932) is a paper on the possibilities of education, and the necessity to emphasize the upward-striving of human personality: "We see here the optimistic force of Individual Psychology asserting that everyone can achieve more if he does not set limits on himself. Neurosis and other failures are probably caused by self-limitation and the individual rules of movement the person establishes." Adler says also that in school, every child has his own opinion about himself reinforced by the teacher. Other schoolmates reflect this opinion. Adler says once again that pampering the children contains many dangers: when the child grows up, he should gradually grow independent in relationship to his/her mother. When the teacher succeeds in his task, the mother no more takes center stage in the life of the child, another person appears on the child's horizon.

Ch. XI The Technique of Treatment (1932) is an unpublished, incomplete manuscript. It is, however, very interesting from the viewpoint of understanding Adler's therapeutic approach. The paper contains a number of practical hints for the therapist. There are hints how to interview the client, and what questions to make. The chapter contains also some interesting case studies. It is not possible to summarize shortly the contents of this paper. May one quotation suffice: "One of the most important points in dealing with neuroses is that the psychiatrist [therapist] must do his utmost to deflate the high value the neurotic places on his symptoms." Reviewer's comment: this is hardly something that anyone should try to do with their friends, or without appropriate counseling, or without diplomacy - the problem is how to do this tactfully, not hurting the other people, and leading them to find this idea themselves, not trying to "convince" them or "selling them" this insight.

To order your copy of Volume 7, go to http://go.ourworld.nu/hstein/cwaa-v7.htm .
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  #14  
Unread December 23rd, 2005, 10:12 PM
Henry Stein Henry Stein is offline
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Default Discussion of CCWAA, Vol. 7, Chapt. XII & XIII (Striving for Superiority, Mind-Body)

On December 26th, we will begin a discussion of The Collected Clinical Works of Alfred Adler, Volume 7, Chapters XII & XIII. The following chapter summaries were prepared by Manu Jaaskelainen.

Ch. XII Origin of the Striving for Superiority and Social Interest (1933) is a paper on some basic concepts in IP. The paper is an important contribution on the philosophy and psychology behind every human action. Adler points out that IP was first to mention that every individual has the striving for completeness. Striving for perfection, striving for superiority, and striving for power belong to the same conceptual family of ideas. Striving for superiority is innate. It is nor a drive, but something that is a necessary condition of life. It is a part of the developmental and evolutionary process. "To live means to develop." Human beings strive to create a favorable relationship between individual and environment. However, dominating others is no guide for the individual or mankind, because everyone cannot choose this direction. The basic direction of human evolution is social feeling. Social interest is also inborn, but it cannot develop under adverse environmental conditions. It unfolds in social association, in the same way as character is developed. It is not irrelevant that the paper was published in 1933, in the year when Hitler took all power in Germany. Adler does not mention this, but instead, he says that social interest needs social understanding in order to develop. On the other hand, social interest is like breathing, we cannot survive without it. "What we have to do in the present critical state is quite clear." He who has correctly understood the meaning of social interest, "will avoid abusing society or letting himself be abused by others."

Ch. XIII Physique and Psyche (1933) is a paper on the mind-body relationship. Adler writes that life is evolutionary and developmental striving, and refers to Darwin and Lamarck. The striving has a goal: "eternal goal of adjustment to the demands of the environment." There is no static point in this process. Psychological traits like mind, character, personality, and intelligence are some of the instruments of this striving. Adler uses Cannon's book The Wisdom of the Body as a reference pointing out that the biological processes of equilibrium presented in that book play their role even in psychology. Overcoming is something that is typical for self-preservation. However, "psychological balance faces constant threats". Adler presents an analysis of the mind-body processes: "... the assault of feelings, emotions and affects influence the physical equilibrium". The chapter contains some case studies that illustrate the argument that physical symptoms may have in certain cases psychological background.

To order your copy of Volume 7, go to http://go.ourworld.nu/hstein/cwaa-v7.htm .
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  #15  
Unread December 25th, 2005, 02:07 PM
magic fingers magic fingers is offline
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Default Re: Discussion of CCWAA, Vol. 7, Chapt. XII & XIII (Striving for Superiority, Mind-Body)

Silat is much more culturally "embedded in Indonesian society for a complex variety of reasons, not the least of which involve self-healing(few medical services, even now).The psychological implications of martial training are tempered with moral imperative as well. Few Silat masters even address religion at all. But all place particular emphasis on social responsibilty. and personal responsibility.
Here is the "oath" of PGB..(Persatuan Gerak Badan) translates into Organization of Body Movement.
Sumpah warga persatuan
1. i accept responsibility for my actions and maintain my integrity as a human being
2.i will maintain social discipline
3.i will be honest
4.i will maintain self discipline
5.i will enhance the science
Each of these tenets are profound in their larger sense....the silat is a vast science...extremely esoteric for equally myriad reasons.....i would like to share ideas with anyone with an interst in this fascinating yet culturally obscure system...thank you ,stanley davis .I lost the first part of this post
and would like to add that Silat offers an incredibly valuable insight into mind-body and psycho-social interaction.The word amok is from Bahasa(Indonesian)
and is not an uncommon occurance for an individual to "snap" and "run amok"
Indonesia has been invaded by practically every invader that history has produced. This coupled with the fact of incredible over-population and the collission of hundreds of dialects and dozens of races, has made a syncretic system like Silat absolutely imperative. However culturally obscure the Silat is to westerners, it is a poweful. esoteric force that exists as surely. if not more so than Zen, for instance.My goal is to engage someone who is interested in such matters....from the mind-body, psycho-social. body-seating level..thank you

Last edited by magic fingers; December 25th, 2005 at 07:38 PM.
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  #16  
Unread December 25th, 2005, 06:50 PM
magic fingers magic fingers is offline
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Default Re: Discussion of CCWAA, Vol. 7, Chapt. XII & XIII (Striving for Superiority, Mind-Body)

The question of whether progress of mankind is possible, probable, impossible, or certain moves everyone today more than ever..........Alfred Adler....(written in 1937)

Last edited by Henry Stein; December 26th, 2005 at 10:47 AM.
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  #17  
Unread December 25th, 2005, 10:37 PM
magic fingers magic fingers is offline
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Default ESSENTIAL MOVEMENTS

In his book, Superiority and Social Interest, Alfred Adler says the the only worthwhile education of the "future man" would be in alignment with all the great movements through the common urge which guides the development of every science and technology,the urge toward a higher development of mankind and the welfare of all.
He goes on to say that", the relaxation of a tensed soul does not happen through the healing power of love. The process is much more difficult.

It is in this spirit that i would like to introduce an ancient and very obscure
system of movement and philosophy to the members of this forum. I have studied and practiced this system for twenty-five years. It is an ancient Indonesial martial science known as Pencak Silat(pen-chok see-lot). The system predates Christ by a thousand years. Virtually unknown in the U.S.. it is widely practiced in Asia. The word Silat in Bahasa(native indonesian) is defined as (a) to make full use of situations and (b) to discourse freely and (c) to avoid unpleasantness.


The highest attainment of Silat is to become a Pandekar or master-healer.
Silat trainers can read volumes about their students by simply watching them move.
I have been a certifed trainer for twenty years and have personally witnessed thr healing effects of simultaneously strenghtening the body while reducing tension and improving basic organ-inferiority. The critical element of body-seating is addressed along with adapting an entirely new set of "postures" and "stances" with which to meet the demands of everyday life. In addition the Silat practictioner is held to the very highest standards of ethical conduct, which holds personal responsibilty to be the foremost duty.
My question to the academic approach of healing through pyscho-therapy
and cognitive therapy.is what is being offered for the BODY? Severe mental states leave lasting effects on the body ,as do excessive tension and the well-known phenomenom of "body-armoring". Without factoring in poor diet and sedentary living, OR the effects of medication, you are still left with a patient who may "think" better but who still "feels" terrible. I hope to hear from anyone interested in these matters.

The question of whether progress of mankind is possible, probable, impossible, or certain moves everyone today more than ever. Alfred Adler (written in 1937)
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  #18  
Unread December 25th, 2005, 10:50 PM
magic fingers magic fingers is offline
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Default Re: ESSENTIAL MOVEMENTS

There is no superiority or inferiority in Silat...Andyan Rahardja.son of Grandmaster Pak Subur Rahardja (deceased) Thank you Andyan for everything.
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  #19  
Unread December 25th, 2005, 11:45 PM
magic fingers magic fingers is offline
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Default PHYSIOGNOMY AND FATE

Alfred Adler's essay Physical Manifestations of Psychic Distubances(1934)
states;"you must not forget that the organism is a unit. and that through a shock in one place the entire organism is set to vibrate.
Someday it will probably be proved that there is no organ inferiority which does not respond to psychic influences and does not speak their language, a language which corresponds to the problem confronting the individual."
It is this particular issue that i wish to ask practicing Adlerians and anyone involved with pyscho-therapy to carefully consider. If organ impairment is the result of psychic distress, will cognitive therapy or pharmaceuticals for brain chemistry restore these critical functions? How about a generalized weakened condition from persistent depression or an episode of mania, for instance? Let me end with Adler's own words. A widespread error exists regarding the concept of society. To understand it correctly we must realize how strongly it is interlinked to the evolution of mankind as something to strive for.The physiognomy is bound up, far more than we have ever realized before, with the degree of harmony existing between the individuaL and the society for which to strive. page 232 Superiority and Social Interest
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  #20  
Unread December 27th, 2005, 10:41 AM
Henry Stein Henry Stein is offline
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Default Re: Discussion of CCWAA, Vol. 7, Chapt. XII & XIII (Striving for Superiority, Mind-Body)

Stanley,

You have raised some provocative questions regarding the mind-body relationship and healing. Adlerians do recognize the need for physical as well as mental health, but this is not primarily why clients usually come to us, so it seems presumptuous to advocate therapeutic measures beyond our knowledge or experience. If clients have an interest in improving diet, and becoming physically fit, there are many resources that they can access. Relieving physical tension and pain can be achieved in various ways; their physician can prescribe medication, or if they are open to alternative medicine, a visit to an acupuncturist or chiropractor can help. For health maintenance, the study of Chi Gung, Tai Chi, Yoga, and Feldenkraus may offer significant benefits. (Their choices may be severely limited by local resources.) Personally, I've studied Chi Gung and Tai Chi for three years and have practiced both for six years. I visit a Directional Non-Force chiropractor every 4-6 weeks for a structural "tune-up." If a client is interested, I may share my personal preferences, but I do not try advocate any single strategy.

Certainly, if a client is experiencing chronic depression, anxiety, or anger, the body is under great tension and weaker organs make break down. It is unclear if all inferior organs can be improved or corrected by any form of exercise, structural re-alignment, herbs, diet, or meditation. If you read Volumes 1 (The Neurotic Character)& 2 (A Study of Organ Inferiority) of The Collected Clinical Works of Alfred Adler, you will find that Adler emphasizes the influence of an unconscious fictional final goal on the entire organism (every cell). In this respect, the root cause of much mental suffering (and some physical suffering) is in the mind, in the form of an impossible ideal. The tension and anxiety that people feel is frequently related to the distance they sense to that ideal. Unless this is corrected in depth psychotherapy, the tension and pain may be temporarily relieved by exercise, massage, structural re-alignment, or meditation, but both tension and pain may probably re-emerge in some form. Frequently, when people strengthen one aspect of their bodily functioning, a new symptom may surface in another weak organ.

Several years ago, I had extensive discussions with my Tai Chi master in San Francisco about the Chinese medicine assumption of relieving or "curing" emotional distress and the accompanying physical symptoms through the balancing of Chi energy. My conclusion was that the Chi Gung exercises and Tai Chi forms could partially compensate for, but not correct, the psychological tension rooted in a dysfunction unconscious goal. So far, I am equally unconvinced of many claims of other body work. A negative, unconscious, fictional final goal can trump the best efforts to restore organ health. (One might speculate that dissolving a negative goal and deeepening the feeling of community might enable the body to naturally promote healing and begin to restore health. Of course, combining this with sensible diet, safe exercise, meaningful work, adequate sleep, a loving relationship, good friends, and a healthy environment will probably yield the best improvement of the mind-body unity.)

Our guiding metaphor in Classical Adlerian depth psychotherapy is that we prefer to "put our the fire" rather than "blow away the smoke."

You can find more discussion about martial arts and psychotherapy in the "Meditation in Psychotherapy Forum Archives" on BOL.

Dr. Stein
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