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  #1  
Unread March 26th, 2008, 12:30 AM
emdrhypno emdrhypno is offline
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Default truth in metaphors

This is a question for you specifically, Stephen, since you're considered one of the experts on Ericksonian metaphors. I've read varying opinions on how much it matters whether therapeutic metaphors are literally true. Rossi claims in "Healing in Hypnosis" that clients can hear it in the voice, while Bandler and grinder seem to think it doesn't matter at all...what do you think?
Jeff
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  #2  
Unread March 31st, 2008, 01:40 PM
Stephen Lankton Stephen Lankton is offline
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Default Re: truth in metaphors

This is a terrific question and I'm glad you asked it. I have also informed Dr. Rossi of his error about this issue. There is a quote published by Dr. Erickson (I believe it is in the article titled "Hypnosis: Its Renascence as a Treatment Modality" wherein he states that he used a number of "confabulated" case stories (in the case of a soldier expereincing a psychosomatically paralyzed arm - Erickson moved the paralysis to his little finger instead). So, obviously Erickson used stories that were not 'true' in the historical sense. For that matter, his first article on the subject concerned an invented story that created an "artificial neurosis in an experimental subject."

Last edited by Stephen Lankton; March 31st, 2008 at 01:53 PM.
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Unread March 31st, 2008, 05:19 PM
emdrhypno emdrhypno is offline
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Default Re: truth in metaphors

Right, the "ejaculatio praecox" article. In that case it was even more of a "lie," wasn't it, because he was getting the subject to believe it was a memory? I guess I sometimes have been so blown away by Erickson's tales of success (both with actual hypnosis stories and with "ordeal" stories) that I was relieved to read Rossi's claim that he usually stuck to the historical truth. It's easy to be skeptical about some of his almost supernatural claims.
I was also intimidated when I read Rossi's assertion, as I don't know if my own short and sheltered life contains all the material needed to make great metaphors for all clients!
Thanks for the lead on "Hypnosis: Its Renascence as a Treatment Modality." Any idea in what book that article might be found?
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  #4  
Unread May 10th, 2008, 04:33 PM
Stephen Lankton Stephen Lankton is offline
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Default Re: truth in metaphors

Oops. Sorry to be so tardy. O overlooked this one: it is on page 3-75 of Vol 4 of the collected papers. I think it is in there...it is where ever the case concerning moving the paralysis of an arm to a little finger, however.
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