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  #11  
Unread June 5th, 2006, 01:01 PM
Henry Stein Henry Stein is offline
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Default Discussion of CCWAA, Vol. 8, Chapt. XXII-XXIV (Distance, Compensation, Compulsion)

June 5th, we will begin a discussion of The Collected Clinical Works of Alfred Adler, Volume 8, Chapters XXII-XXIV. The following chapter summaries were prepared by Manu Jaaskelainen.

Ch. XXII Lecture No. 18 is based on a case of a man 50 who has no friends. He had one very peculiar habit that made it for him difficult to have social contacts. Adler concludes his case illustration stating that in all cases where a person has distanced himself for years from social contacts, the therapist must help him find ways to re-enter society.

Ch. XXIII Differences in Psychic Compensation (1931) is a paper based on a speech at a physician's conference. Compensation must take place in a manner that satisfies the child: that give a feeling of having overcome some demand of life in a useful or useless way. According to Adler, causal explanations are insufficient in providing useful models for explanation; for this reason, final models are needed. Individual Psychology uncovers the roots of the symptoms or exaggergations, thus achieving a new understanding of the choice of the symptoms.

Ch. XXIV Discussion of Compulsion Neurosis (undated) is paper based on a record of his contribution in a conference--possibly Adler was presenting his views in a discussion. Adler says that every compulsion neurosis is an assault on life. It is a revolt against unalterable facts of life. Many compulsive people are ambitious, they have a good professional status, and some have been socially successful. However, these people suffer from inferiority feelings, and the idea of worthlessness. In therapy, Adler recommends telling the client that he is not worthless, and he/she can make a valuable contribution to society.

To order your copy of Volume 8, go to http://go.ourworld.nu/hstein/cwaa-v8.htm .
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  #12  
Unread June 17th, 2006, 12:30 PM
Henry Stein Henry Stein is offline
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Default Discussion of CCWAA, Vol. 8, Chapt. XXV-XXVI (Freud, Neurosis)

June 19th, we will begin a discussion of The Collected Clinical Works of Alfred Adler, Volume 8, Chapters XXV-XXVI. The following chapter summaries were prepared by Manu Jaaskelainen.

Ch. XXV Freud's Psychoanalysis and the Unconscious (undated) is an unpublished paper on the differences between psychoanalysis and IP. The paper is somewhat polemical, because the relationships between Freud and Adler were always very tense. Adler starts presenting Freud as standing with one foot in the Frensch school (Bernheim, Charcot, Janet). What was characteristic for Freud was his theory that the unconscious is basically sexual; thus, the striving for power is e.g. explained on the basis of the autoerotic attitude of the child (narcissism). This is a conception that is not acceptable to Adler; for him, the striving for power is a tendency that is not reducible to any drives. Then follows a discussion on the Oedipus Complex. Even this conception is not acceptable to Adler; from his point of view, this complex, if there is such a complex, is explainable as the striving of the child to "grow bigger" than the father, to have power to dominate the parents. According to Adler, one primary current in human motivation is an innate social feeling; another arises from the striving to superiority. The key to the unconscious is, according to Adler, to be found in these two sources.

Ch. XXVI The Etiology and Treatment of Neurosis (undated) is an unpublished manuscript wherein Adler recapitulates some landmarks in the development of IP. Adler points out that the inferior organs as such are never causes of the feelings inferiority. What counts, is the situation and the attitude of the client. All drives, all emotions are placed at the service of the lifestyle. A neurosis is an expression of a lack of preparation for solving the questions of life. Problems occur because people are not prepared. Psychological tension occurs because people do not feel themselves at home in the world; insufficient preparation produces insecurity and the feeling that the environment is hostile.

To order your copy of Volume 8, go to http://go.ourworld.nu/hstein/cwaa-v8.htm .
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Henry T. Stein, Ph.D,

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  #13  
Unread June 26th, 2006, 09:17 AM
Henry Stein Henry Stein is offline
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Default Discussion of CCWAA, Vol. 8, Chapt. XXVII-XXVIII (Crime, Neurosis, Compulsion)

June 26th, we will begin a discussion of The Collected Clinical Works of Alfred Adler, Volume 8, Chapters XXVII-XXVIII. The following chapter summaries were prepared by Manu Jaaskelainen.

Ch. XXVII Crime and Neurosis (undated) is an unpublished manuscript that is based probably on the proceedings of a meeting for Individual Psychology in Berlin. Adler begins his paper warning once again against too narrow interpretations. What the individual reveals to us, is always only one aspect of his/her personality. Adler says also that it is not possible to make any interpretations on the basis of some presumed hereditary trait. Comparing crime and neurosis, Adler says that both are various forms of failures. According to Adler, the society (=us) should make an utmost effort to prevent crime. The single most important factor here is to develop life styles that are based on social feeling. In order to achieve this, the totality of social relations should be reformed.

Ch. XXVIII Medical Working Group: Case of a Man with Compulsion Neurosis (1929) is also an unpublished manuscript. The paper contains a case report by Adler before a group of physicians who were practising Individual Psychologists. It is a story of a 48-year-old male university teacher. Although an exceptional specialist, he had never really been recognized. His relationships with his parents had always been tense, because he was never accepted by them. However, Adler finds that in this case the real source of the problems of the client were his real purposes: his goal was always to isolate himself from everyone. So the finalistic perspective brings about a change in the diagnosis. One of his problems was a compulsive need to spit. He even lost a fine academic appointment because of this peculiarity in his behavior. "He was terrified of testing his abilities, so he invented a symptom to gain distance from a world he perceived as hostile." In therapy, it is important that the therapist wins over the client so that he believes the therapist genuinely wants to help him out of his misery, not for financial gain or personal triumph.

To order your copy of Volume 8, go to http://go.ourworld.nu/hstein/cwaa-v8.htm .
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Henry T. Stein, Ph.D,

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