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  #11  
Unread November 8th, 2004, 07:52 AM
Bruce Kirkcaldy Bruce Kirkcaldy is offline
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Default Re: What is good teaching?

Thanks for your detailled comments. Indeed the workshop was not only directed at teachers but medical professionals including psychotherapists. Judging from the feedback we obtained, teachers and therapists are not particularly "easy" clients.

I am reminded of a citation again. One by Thomas Szasz and written in his book "Psychoanalytic Training" (1958)
... We conclude that - the psychology of human relationships being what it is - in adult education there is an inverse relationship between "power" and "learning". Only the "weak" can teach. If the teacher comes into too much power, he ceases to be a "teacher" and becomes instead a religious or political (or other "group") "leader."

I think Steve's reference to power - not only in teaching, but in therapeutic relationships - is one frequently overlooked in our search for solutions.
It is probably one of the explanations that explain why when therapy is completed and therapist and client compare "notes", the sessions and interventions that made a difference can be quite different! At least, my clients make reference to events that happened in therapy that I had overlooked because of their "apparent triviality".
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  #12  
Unread November 9th, 2004, 11:48 PM
aklal2003 aklal2003 is offline
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Default Re: What is good teaching?

The best discussion on the subject is at the Re-Designing Schools Confrence,
Shown on and available at Knowledgeworks section of Bill and Belinda Gates Foundation page accessible from Bill Gates Home Page. You can get a link to Bill Gates Home page by searching Google for Bill Gates,

The Main points brought up in the Confrence- shown as video -is (i) To have a good Education/School System, the critical element is a good Teacher.
To have agood teacher the school should provide necessary environment and follow teacher friendly policies, including building long term relationships with teacher-school, teacher- student duos. This means not frquent transfers. Provide fascilities for pre class preperations, and developing systems to promote student teache relationships. From the students point of view a good teacher is the one who takes them seriously, is interested in their learning, and commands respect by taking teaching seriously.
This is more important than than what you teach or how you teach.

Last edited by aklal2003; November 9th, 2004 at 11:58 PM.
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  #13  
Unread November 10th, 2004, 08:48 AM
Bruce Kirkcaldy Bruce Kirkcaldy is offline
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Default Re: What is good teaching?

Dear "Author",

I appreciate all comments on this theme because they have helped me in prganising my own ideas, not only for teaching research but psychotherapy. I did indeed try finding the Bill Gates page. To be quite honest, judging by my experience with teachers, the position is more complex. I couldnt find the original contribution by Gates, but the idea that content and style are not that important would not seem to be consistent with what teachers and therapists are telling me.

Nevetheless thanks for your ideas. What is your name by the way? I think it is much nicer if I could respond by using your Christian name!
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