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  #1  
Unread September 7th, 2004, 10:13 AM
Henry Stein Henry Stein is offline
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Default Parallels to and Research in Adlerian Psychology - "The Dangerous Corner of War"

This thread is for information about newspaper articles, journal articles, books, or research projects that reflect some of Adler's ideas. If any topic becomes very active, it will be transferred into a separate thread. Please post any item as a reply to this message.
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Last edited by Henry Stein; October 24th, 2004 at 10:02 AM.
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  #2  
Unread September 7th, 2004, 10:38 AM
Henry Stein Henry Stein is offline
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Default Re: Parallels to Adlerian Psychology

Social Interest in Sports?

The August 29, 2004 issue of Parade Magazine features an article by Jeffrey Marx titled "He Turns Boys Into Men." It explores the football coaching philosophy of Joe Ehrmann. He redefines manhood and offers a recipe for being a better man: 1) Recognize the three lies of false masculinity; athletic ability, sexual conquest, and economic success are not the best measurements of manhood. 2) Allow yourself to love and be loved; build and value relationships. Accept responsibility, lead courageously, and enact justice on behalf of others; practice the concepts of empathy, inclusion, and integrity. 3) Learn the importance of serving others; base your thoughts and actions on "What can I do for you?" 4) Develop a cause beyond yourself; try to leave the world a better place because you were there.

His high school football team, the Gilman Greyhounds, was undefeated in three of their last six seasons. Ehrmann is also a minister and has founded a community center, a house for sick children, and has launched a racial-reconcilation project in Baltimore.
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Last edited by Henry Stein; September 9th, 2004 at 05:56 PM.
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  #3  
Unread October 4th, 2004, 04:29 PM
Manu Jaaskelainen Manu Jaaskelainen is offline
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Default Re: Parallels to Adlerian Psychology

I have recently studied a new biography of the great Russian writer Alexander Pushkin (T.J.Binyon: Pushkin. A Biography. HarperCollins 2003). It is now available as a paperbound edition, and it contains xxix+731 pages. Numerous maps, illustrations and graphs increase the information-value of this fine biography of the great Russian genius. All good biographies make psychologically a very interesting reading, and this book by T.J.Binyon is especially interesting from an Adlerian point of view. The author starts the book with a citation by Pushkin himself: "What business is it of the critic or reader whether I am handsome or ugly, come from an ancient nobility or am not of gentle birth, whether I am good or wicked, crawl at the feet of the mighty or do not even exchange bows with them, whether I gamble at cards and so on. My future biographer, if God sends me a biographer, will concern himself with this." In this citation, Pushkin defines himself his most important personal problems. One should add, perhaps, his relationships with the many ladies he met during his relatively short but colorfull life. Binyon provides us with a first-rate description and analysis of Pushkin's psychological, social, and cultural background, not to forget his innumerable and never-ending financial troubles. All this is done in a very sympathetic manner. In the end, the reader has a feeling of being a kind of Pushkin's confidant. Binyon's book helps to develop understanding between different cultures, because he has so intimate knowledge himself of Russian culture and society. The writer helps to demystify the concept of a special Russian "folk-mind". What Pushkin feels, says and writes, is perfectly understandable for a modern reader if he or she takes the pains to study this excellent biography. We see how Pushkin develops from a hesitant and timid schoolboy, through a number of personal and social crises to writer who has found his identity in literature. His physical appearance was described by his contemporaries generally in very unfavorable terms. There was hardly any racism in the modern sense of the word in Russian early 19th century society, but neither was it any great asset to have a black background. Pushkin's genius was so great that his physical background becomes a totally irrelevant aspect compared to his achievements. However, somewhere deep hidden there is still this small, dark, ugly, hesitant, timid boy who must bow to His Majesty the Czar, who all his life must struggle with his smallness compared with the most powerful and formidable persons of his age. Remember what Alfred Adler said about the artists and the writers? They are the real leaders of mankind. When the mighty and the powerful are dead, the art and literature continue to live, and in the end, they define what was great and what was small, what was valuable and what was worthless in this specific age. Pushkin was struggling all his life. In the end, he was shot in a senseless duel. But this was only a beginning of Pushkin's legend. There is never-ending influence of his writings that is today felt all over the world, not only in Russia.
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  #4  
Unread October 4th, 2004, 08:22 PM
Henry Stein Henry Stein is offline
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Default Re: Parallels to Adlerian Psychology

Adler's opinion about artists is echoed at the end of his article "Dostoyevski," (Chapter XVII in "The Collected Clinical Works of Alfred Adler, Volume 4").

..... "Thus, Dostoyevsky stands before us as an artist and a great and unequaled moral philosopher.

His achievements as a psychologist have still not been exhausted. We venture to proclaim that his psychological vision penetrated deeper because he was more attuned to nature than those whose knowledge of psychology rested only on abstract perceptions. Consider Dostoyevsky’s observations on the Meaning of Laughter , where he examines the possibility of understanding an individual based on his laughter better than from his attitude on life. Also, consider the concept of the accidental family where every member lives isolated from one another, and where children are inculcated with self-love. These perceptions show that Dostoyevsky had seen more than can be asked of, or expected, from any psychologist today. Consider how Dostoyevsky described in A Raw Youth that the boy under the cover of his blanket allows all fantasies to stream out culminating in one, single, concept: Power! Consider how he described so clearly and accurately the origin of emotional disturbances as a way of revolting. Consider also how Dostoyevsky recognized that human beings have a tendency to be despotic. Such a person can still teach us today and, as Nietsche advocated, should be celebrated as our teacher. His understanding and explanation for dreams have still not been superseded, and his perception that no one acts without a goal, a finality, coincides with the most modern achievements of Individual Psychology.

It is thus that Dostoyevsky has endeared himself as a great teacher. The reality of life is what impacts on us like a shaft of light striking the eyes of a person asleep. The sleeper rubs his eyes, turns in his sleep, and knows nothing of what had happened. Dostoyevsky slept little and awakened many. His characters, his ethics, and his art lead us deep into the concept of a social existence."
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  #5  
Unread October 24th, 2004, 11:59 AM
sslavik sslavik is offline
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Default Re: Parallels to and Research in Adlerian Psychology

I would like to announce to all readers a research project for which James Croake and I are soliciting participants/volunteers.

We are hoping that some individuals might participate in a pilot study relating intellectual curiosity to early memories in individuals who teach or do research in a university setting.

We hope to study the individual devoted to intellectual pursuits, to "the life of the mind," the "intellectual," the person who has a drive to understand how things work, at least in some specialized field. We want to study the person who, if not "driven" at least would feel at a loss if he or she had to relinquish his or her intellectual interests. That is, we want to study the person for whom an intellectual devotion is in some sense natural and ingrained. We want to study the person who exercises his or her curiosity. We want to study not what this person thinks, but how he or she thinks. We want to study what has motivated him or her throughout his or her career.

We are looking for individuals of this "style" who have also elected to work (teach and/or do research) within an academic environment. The academic environment offers particular opportunities and resources to develop one's curiosity, as well as offering particular challenges. Although we do not want to study these opportunities and/or challenges, the election of an academic environment within which to work may indicate a specific devotion to or commitment to one's intellectual nature, as well as to opportunities to develop it.

Accordingly, we are searching for individuals who work within academic institutions who probably have a Ph. D. in their field, and who will self-define themselves as one of the people we wish to study. This self-definition will be the initial part of the questionnaire we will send to those willing to participate. These individuals will also define their own successes or satisfactions in their area of endeavour. We do not define these individuals in terms of their awards or publications. Although they may have obtained awards and have publications, the individuals whom we are seeking will define their successes and satisfactions in other ways.

Initially, we would send interested individuals a questionnaire that may take several hours to complete. Once returned to us, we would have other questions that we would present to the individual by email. In anything we write, complete anonymity will be observed. As well, if at any time an individual wishes to withdraw from the study, only one question will be asked: “Would you mind explaining why?”

We are also interested in presenting this proposal to individuals in a variety of fields. If you know others who might be interested, no matter what their field of study, we would appreciate your forwarding this letter to them.

Please address any questions you may have to either of us.
Thanks for reading this lengthy letter.

Sincerely,

Steve Slavik
229 West Queens Road
North Vancouver, BC Canada V7N 2K6

sslavik@telus.net


James Croake
Department of Psychiatry
University of South Alabama
Mobile, Alabama

jwcroake@bellsouth.net

Last edited by sslavik; October 24th, 2004 at 01:33 PM.
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  #6  
Unread October 30th, 2004, 11:39 PM
sslavik sslavik is offline
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Default Re: Parallels to and Research in Adlerian Psychology

I have available a preliminary version of a report on

PROFESSED SKILLS OF EXPERIENCED COUNSELLORS EXPRESSED IN EARLY MEMORIES

which I can make available by email to anyone interested in reading it. Anyone wishing a copy can send me an email [sslavik@telus.net] and I'll forward a copy.

Steve
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  #7  
Unread February 2nd, 2005, 05:30 PM
Henry Stein Henry Stein is offline
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Default Re: Parallels to and Research in Adlerian Psychology

I've just received a manuscript titled "The Inferior Complex in Paranoia Re-addressed: A Study With the Implicit Association Test," by Steffen Moritz, Ronny Werner, and Gernot von Collani; the article is now in press at Cognitive Neuropsychiatry. The authors provide evidence in favor of Adler's theory that patients with paranoia indeed have a deep-rooted low self-esteem which they try to conceal from themselves and others. They have verified this account with an "objective" cognitive paradigm, the Implicit Association Test.
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Unread March 5th, 2006, 10:41 AM
Henry Stein Henry Stein is offline
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Default Re: Parallels to and Research in Adlerian Psychology

Empathy, Altruism, and Cooperation in Babies (From "Science in the News" Web Site)

Toddlers Eager to Assist Clumsy Scientist

from Associated Press: WASHINGTON - Oops, the scientist dropped his clothespin. Not to worry; a wobbly toddler raced to help, eagerly handing it back. The simple experiment shows the capacity for altruism emerges as early as 18 months of age, the scientist says. Toddlers' desire to help out signals fairly sophisticated brain development and is a trait of interest to anthropologists trying to tease out the evolutionary roots of altruism and cooperation. Psychology researcher Felix Warneken performed a series of ordinary tasks in front of toddlers, such as hanging towels with clothespins or stacking books. Sometimes he "struggled" with the tasks; sometimes he deliberately messed up.

Read the full article at: http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2002840717_baby03.html
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  #9  
Unread June 26th, 2006, 09:57 AM
Henry Stein Henry Stein is offline
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Default Re: Parallels to and Research in Adlerian Psychology - Equality and Health

In the spirit of Adler's first publication in 1898, "Health Manual for the Tailoring Trade," wherein Alfred Adler, the physician, described the working, living, and health conditions of tailors in Vienna, 108 years later, another physician, Stephen Bezruchka, a professor of Public Health and Community Medicine at the University of Washington, published an article titled "Economic Equality is the Best Medicine" in the June 25th, 2006 issue of the Seattle Post-Intelligence. Bezruchka argues that countries with the largest economic disparities have the least healthy populations ("there is less caring and sharing"), and that our concerns about "health care" instead of "health" miss the crucial point of prevention. He claims that: "The United States used to be one of the healthiest countries in the world when egalitarian principles were near the horizon." Like Adler, Bezruchka believes that social equality and economic justice are essential for a physically and mentally healthy society.
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  #10  
Unread July 3rd, 2006, 09:48 AM
Henry Stein Henry Stein is offline
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Default Science of Siblings

The July 10th issue of Time magazine features a cover story on "The New Science of Siblings." Check it out at http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...he_new_science. Sadly, Adler's contribution to birth order is not mentioned, nor are the other potential influences on personality formation given any weight. The writer falls into the seductive trap of "one cause," simplistic thinking. A few years ago, Judith Harris claimed that children's friends were the primary influence on personlaity formation. Check "The Style of Life Tree" at http://go.ourworld.nu/hstein/tree.htm for a Classical Adlerian perspective.
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