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-   -   Vegas hypnotist -is this for real? (http://www.behavior.net/bolforums/showthread.php?t=816)

William Reid August 23rd, 2010 09:47 AM

Re: Vegas hypnotist -is this for real?
 
There are lots of case examples out there, some more credible than others. None of mine is from stage hypnosis. My past trance work (mostly during the 1970s and 1980s, when it was a part of my practice and research, but not the majority of it) has included habit control (limited success), treatment of sleepwalking (good success using a methodology I published in the American Journal of Psychotherapy, Western Journal of Medicine, and elsewhere), pain control (limited success), psychotherapy adjunct (limited usefulness), and one case of bleeding control (limited data; methodology similar to, but at a different bleeding site than, established dental hypnosis for oozing after extractions).

I have been interested in, but am well aware of the limitations of, various kinds of forensic hypnosis and the topic of memory volatility. Those fields are fraught with myth and misunderstanding among both professionals and, especially, laypersons. Don't believe what you see in the movies.

Apropos the ethics and legal topics of this forum, it would be interesting to have posts from clinicians about ethical or legal issues/experiences involving hypnosis.

Da Friendly Puter Tech August 25th, 2010 10:15 AM

Re: Vegas hypnotist -is this for real?
 
Yeah.... And next... we believe that a memory hypnosis thing proves as a fact that people were abducted by aliens, tortured by monsters, ohh... and hypnosis is absolute proof perfect that people were abducted and raped or whatever else, by satan worshippers...

Yeah, thats what we all believe. Ohh, and I would love to sell you a bridge in Brooklyn for $5.

(In other words - dont use hypnosis for memory retrieval, it has a high risk of messing with your memories, and not in a good way!)

Malene

Miccoro September 21st, 2010 03:48 PM

Re: Vegas hypnotist -is this for real?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by William Reid (Post 7114)
There are lots of case examples out there, some more credible than others. None of mine is from stage hypnosis. My past trance work (mostly during the 1970s and 1980s, when it was a part of my practice and research, but not the majority of it) has included habit control (limited success), treatment of sleepwalking (good success using a methodology I published in the American Journal of Psychotherapy, Western Journal of Medicine, and elsewhere), pain control (limited success), psychotherapy adjunct (limited usefulness), and one case of bleeding control (limited data; methodology similar to, but at a different bleeding site than, established dental hypnosis for oozing after extractions).

I have been interested in, but am well aware of the limitations of, various kinds of forensic hypnosis and the topic of memory volatility. Those fields are fraught with myth and misunderstanding among both professionals and, especially, laypersons. Don't believe what you see in the movies.

Apropos the ethics and legal topics of this forum, it would be interesting to have posts from clinicians about ethical or legal issues/experiences involving hypnosis.

What type of practice did you use?An what is about you research?

William Reid September 27th, 2010 08:22 AM

Re: Vegas hypnotist -is this for real?
 
The hypnosis research was really research into treatment of sleepwalking in adults. It started when I was a psychiatrist in the U.S. Army, during the early 1970s, where soldiers would be discharged if they had a sleepwalking problem. Many wanted to stay in the Army, so we had a motivated group of subjects. The hypnosis treatment, which consisted largely of the suggestion that they would awaken from any sleep immediately when they felt their feet touch the ground, worked well for many. As I recall, I was not the originator of the idea, but heard in (or read it) in something related to the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis.

A few years later, I compared the hypnotic approach with use of low bedtime doses of a benzodiazepine medication that promotes REM sleep (most sleepwalking occurs in non-REM sleep). As I recall the two approaches worked about equally well (but the people on whom they worked may not have been the same).

My main induction practice, if that's what you wanted to know, was/is progressive relaxation followed by a stairstep-down visualization.

That's probably more than you wanted to know.


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