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  #1  
Unread January 4th, 2007, 06:12 PM
late 30s late 30s is offline
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Default Mental Health benefits of exercise?

I have been reading quite abit about exercise and its psychological benefits. Wondering why there isn't much out here about it.

They also say that it creates brain cells (neurogenesis) similar to that of antidepressants.(?). Changing your life = changing your brain?

Interestingly, when I was in a highly competetive sport in my late teens-early 20s I was very fit and also think it is the only time in my life I was a free-spirited 'happy' person, but maybe we all were in our early 20's compared.

Do many out here find it very beneficial? Thanks.
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  #2  
Unread August 3rd, 2008, 10:03 AM
sk8rgrl23 sk8rgrl23 is offline
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Default Re: Mental Health benefits of exercise?

I think there is a fair amount of information out there on the role of exercise in treating depression. I think unfortunately we live in a "I want it now and not have to work for it" culture and also with the mayhem of advertising by pharmaceutical companies we have fostered a societal addiction to prescription drugs.

As far as exercise, I'm a firm believer myself. i try to do something every day, but for me it has to be something fun, where I'm learning something new, not just going to the gym and having a machine move my limbs around. Personally I like figure skating and skateboarding because not only does it get me moving and release those endorphins but for that time I'm doing that it takes me completely away from every day life, as while I'm doing that I'm thinking about nothign else but that exact thing. There is no feeling like doing a spin on ice or on a skateboard sailing down a ramp and curving around the banks, both feel like flight to me. But I also get some benefits from riding my bike or walking, just that topsy-turvey thrill factor isn't there. but nonetheless I think anything that gets your heart rate going and gets you moving.

I have strong feelings about how we diagnose and subsequently medicate clients. between the immediate gratification factor and the pressure from pharmaceuticals (everywhere you go in the health care field you see clocks, stickie notepads, pens, rollodexes, all with insignias of various medications). Too many doctores and clients have a knee-jerk reaction to depression, or more accurately, a depressed mood or stressful situation. I can't tell you how many clients have come into my office reporting that they had a death in the family, or trouble at work and now they feel their medication isn't working because they find themselves upset/anxious/angry/depressed. To which I am inclined to say a big resounding "SO WHAT?" When did it become unacceptable to feel an unpleasant emotion?!?!?!?

And then there's the question of addiction in terms of do people develop tolerance to antidepressants? How many clients have you seen get into a continual cycle of having to have their meds "adjusted" which most often means the dosage is increased or they are put on a stronger antidepressant. We talk so much about the problem of tolerance in chemical dependency circles, the concept of always needing more to get the same effect, but nobody talks about this with legally sanctioned pharmaceuticals, doctors just unquestioningly prescribe the next higher dose, or put their patients on stronger drugs. What's the problem with this? side effects. people gain weight, people have insomnia or sleep too much or lose motivation, all things that contribute to depression in themselves. so how much good are we doing people when we allow lay people to just take the next bigger pill?

And diet is also grossly overlooked. How many depressed people find themselves grazing on highly processed high glycemic foods that keep them in a chronic subclinical state of malnutrition and then they wonder why they feel like crap? then Celexa comes to the rescue, because "depression hurts all over"

BTW, when I was in my 20's I exercised all the time, had no choice couldn';t afford a car so I had to bike or walk anywhere I wanted to go. I was also very depressed during that age, I think 20's is a hard age to be when you're trying to get started out in life, but I definitely think the exercise helped.
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  #3  
Unread January 24th, 2009, 05:02 PM
jeta01 jeta01 is offline
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Default Re: Mental Health benefits of exercise?

There is a wealth of evidence supporting exercise as part of the treatment of depression. The NICE guidelines which all GPs should be up to date with supports this explicitly, and so anyone consulting a health professional with mood disturbance should expect to answer questions about how much exercise they do. It can be useful to quantify this, "exercise" is such a subjective term. Many people reply that they walk the dog each day, or walk to the shops etc. and want to know if this is enough. It is usually helpful to find out how strenous the walking is, if they are comfortably dawdling along then the social aspect, or just getting out of the house, may well be helpful, but as "exercise" not so much.
I knew that 30 minutes of relatively strenuous exercise in a day (ie enough to increase your breathing and heart rates) was found to be benificial for both mental and physical health. However, I only found out recently that it does not have to be all in one go, so people who have 3 lots of 10 minute bursts of exercise will benefit equally. This seems much more managable for those with increasingly busy lifestyles to acheive.

I hope this may be of some help.
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  #4  
Unread January 16th, 2010, 03:23 PM
sunshine37 sunshine37 is offline
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Default Re: Mental Health benefits of exercise?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sk8rgrl23 View Post
I think there is a fair amount of information out there on the role of exercise in treating depression. I think unfortunately we live in a "I want it now and not have to work for it" culture and also with the mayhem of advertising by pharmaceutical companies we have fostered a societal addiction to prescription drugs.

As far as exercise, I'm a firm believer myself. i try to do something every day, but for me it has to be something fun, where I'm learning something new, not just going to the gym and having a machine move my limbs around. Personally I like figure skating and skateboarding because not only does it get me moving and release those endorphins but for that time I'm doing that it takes me completely away from every day life, as while I'm doing that I'm thinking about nothign else but that exact thing. There is no feeling like doing a spin on ice or on a skateboard sailing down a ramp and curving around the banks, both feel like flight to me. But I also get some benefits from riding my bike or walking, just that topsy-turvey thrill factor isn't there. but nonetheless I think anything that gets your heart rate going and gets you moving.

I have strong feelings about how we diagnose and subsequently medicate clients. between the immediate gratification factor and the pressure from pharmaceuticals (everywhere you go in the health care field you see clocks, stickie notepads, pens, rollodexes, all with insignias of various medications). Too many doctores and clients have a knee-jerk reaction to depression, or more accurately, a depressed mood or stressful situation. I can't tell you how many clients have come into my office reporting that they had a death in the family, or trouble at work and now they feel their medication isn't working because they find themselves upset/anxious/angry/depressed. To which I am inclined to say a big resounding "SO WHAT?" When did it become unacceptable to feel an unpleasant emotion?!?!?!?

And then there's the question of addiction in terms of do people develop tolerance to antidepressants? How many clients have you seen get into a continual cycle of having to have their meds "adjusted" which most often means the dosage is increased or they are put on a stronger antidepressant. We talk so much about the problem of tolerance in chemical dependency circles, the concept of always needing more to get the same effect, but nobody talks about this with legally sanctioned pharmaceuticals, doctors just unquestioningly prescribe the next higher dose, or put their patients on stronger drugs. What's the problem with this? side effects. people gain weight, people have insomnia or sleep too much or lose motivation, all things that contribute to depression in themselves. so how much good are we doing people when we allow lay people to just take the next bigger pill?

And diet is also grossly overlooked. How many depressed people find themselves grazing on highly processed high glycemic foods that keep them in a chronic subclinical state of malnutrition and then they wonder why they feel like crap? then Celexa comes to the rescue, because "depression hurts all over"

BTW, when I was in my 20's I exercised all the time, had no choice couldn';t afford a car so I had to bike or walk anywhere I wanted to go. I was also very depressed during that age, I think 20's is a hard age to be when you're trying to get started out in life, but I definitely think the exercise helped.



you talk ALOT of sense sk8ter,and i wholeheartedly agree with everything you say here..thanks for having an intelligent brain! more people with your ideas in the world please!
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  #5  
Unread July 27th, 2010, 02:47 PM
David Morgan David Morgan is offline
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Default Re: Mental Health benefits of exercise?

I know that - and this is obviously anecdotal, but I think there probably are studies that would back me up - I have felt improvements myself when I exercised, and seen improvements in people around me.

Of course, it doesn't mean it would work for everyone. There are people who have a physical disability of other health problem that might make the kind of exercise needed for benefits difficult or even dangerous.
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  #6  
Unread August 11th, 2010, 01:06 PM
witnessing_presence witnessing_presence is offline
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Default Re: Mental Health benefits of exercise?

Quote:
Originally Posted by late 30s View Post
I have been reading quite abit about exercise and its psychological benefits. Wondering why there isn't much out here about it.

They also say that it creates brain cells (neurogenesis) similar to that of antidepressants.(?). Changing your life = changing your brain?

Interestingly, when I was in a highly competetive sport in my late teens-early 20s I was very fit and also think it is the only time in my life I was a free-spirited 'happy' person, but maybe we all were in our early 20's compared.

Do many out here find it very beneficial? Thanks.


Well, mental exercise brings you into the body, and out of the mind. 99 percent of the problems are mind created -- one feels more natural, more healthy when doing exercise
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  #7  
Unread September 4th, 2010, 04:03 AM
Norton Norton is offline
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Default Re: Mental Health benefits of exercise?

Very interresting topic...Thanks for such question
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  #8  
Unread September 4th, 2010, 10:02 AM
Denn5525 Denn5525 is offline
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Default Re: Mental Health benefits of exercise?

I think an overlooked factor as to why exercise is so beneficial is the fact that you may be outside, soaking in sunrays, fresh air and depending on where you are, the beauty of nature. Jogging or hiking in the woods comes to mind. Also, if its a competitive sport (with the emphasis of fun) then the social component can play a big role in alleviating depressions.

If for some reason one is limited to do such exercising there's always meditation at home. Thats an exercise too that can help stimulate the brain and hormonal balance.
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  #9  
Unread September 5th, 2010, 03:52 PM
PeterC PeterC is offline
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Default Re: Mental Health benefits of exercise?

I think that people mentaly get stronger while doing hard physical excercise. They overcome theyr sticks, and by doing it they not only get confidence in theyr self's, but also the body fitness which is good ofcourse.
I also use Herbs as my main diet supplement.
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  #10  
Unread September 7th, 2010, 02:37 AM
sam.mark sam.mark is offline
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Default Re: Mental Health benefits of exercise?

"exersice is one really important thing, not only to keep you fit, but also to keep you happy"
these were the lines ma trainer told me on the very first day, n i guess he was totally right...
this is the only stress buster i get in ma daily routine...
its so relaxing....:-)
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