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James Brody
January 28th, 2006, 05:08 PM
There are multiple stories: EP is, primarily, a historical science that makes predictions, sometimes verified in contemporary studies. It also generates searches for previously unsuspected relationships/events.

The HBES site is a trove of references; the past and future conference proceedings should alert you to modern issues.
www.hbes.com.

Once you pick a topic, Google generally produces more leads.

JB

Margaret McGhee
January 29th, 2006, 03:43 PM
Thanks for the link to HBES - what a wealth of good info. That should keep me busy for a while.

Cheers :cool:

alexandra_k
February 1st, 2006, 01:12 AM
Hey. I'm sure I read somewhere (not having a good day today) that you were interested in EP models of the mind.

?

If so... I'll reccomend:
'Thought in a hostile world'
(can find it via google)
he talks about how cognitive states have evolved (most notably belief and desire / preference). Their relation to one another, their evolutionary function, the selection pressures that were operating etc.

He also offers a critique of the (earlier) modular theory of mind.

James Brody
February 4th, 2006, 05:31 PM
My own career:

1) Do whatever adults, related or not, told me to do. (Southern mother, Army father) I still "sir" and "M'am" most ambulatory critters.

2) Denver University: "Accept the word of no man as final and value the life of the mind in a free society in an every expanding universe." So commanded Russ Porter in his charge to the class of '64 when the "Harvard of the West" turned 100. DU had only 5000 students and her faculty loved questions and debate and ever-compliant and eager to earn my scholarships, I obeyed and thrived.

3) Go east young man to expand opportunities and your thought. Pitt and I found each other but Pitt found a rebel with crewcut and I found a stuffy sort of place where Arnold Buss, father of THE David Buss, once warned me, "You're new here, otherwise you would know that grad students don't ask such questions." Also, from another narcissist, "Your job is not to do great research but to get your degree."

I disobeyed and eventually pulled in 1300 reprint requests for my dissertation.

My advice: Remember Simon Conway Morris's quip: "Copy from one person, it's plagiarism; copy from lots of people, it's scholarship." Don't spend too many evenings in Internet arenas. Find a good mentor who has references and equipment before you go to the library. Get your fingers smudged, sore, and dirty and risk a friendship with evil caffeine. And don't think too much: research says that thinking too much will get you depressed. Or in the words of that great philosopher, Faith Hill about "think'n": "That won't get you too far"!

JB

alexandra_k
February 9th, 2006, 02:18 AM
> My advice: Remember Simon Conway Morris's quip: "Copy from one person, it's plagiarism; copy from lots of people, it's scholarship."

Lol. Ain't that the truth!

> Don't spend too many evenings in Internet arenas.

Yep. Dare I say... I'm between degrees (and that is why I've had more time than I will once I start up). Also... The reason why I go on about 'that is what I'm really interested in' all the time... Perhaps even contradicting myself... Is because I'm searching for a thesis topic. I'm actually trying to convince myself ;-)
(Research only PhD so no more course work...)

> Find a good mentor who has references and equipment before you go to the library.

Equipment?

> Get your fingers smudged, sore, and dirty and risk a friendship with evil caffeine.

Lol. Caffeine is my best friend already :-)

> And don't think too much: research says that thinking too much will get you depressed. Or in the words of that great philosopher, Faith Hill about "think'n": "That won't get you too far"!

Hmm. Depends whether you can write it up or not ;-)